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Breaking the barrier

Faces of ASU Special Edition: My “Rosey” Nguyen

Published: Monday, March 11, 2013

Updated: Monday, March 11, 2013 17:03

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Caitlin LaFarlette, Photo Editor

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Paige Walker, Staff Photographer

Just picture it for a moment. You are realizing the dream you’ve had since you were a child. You have to pinch yourself to make sure you’re awake because this is the moment you’ve daydreamed about more than a dozen times. You are awake though, and it’s real.

That’s the feeling Rosey had when she realized she was standing on U.S. soil, about to start her degree at Arkansas State University.

My “Rosey” Nguyen is a normal college student. She studies hard. She makes lots of “to-do” lists. She enjoys spending time with her boyfriend. But Rosey goes beyond the responsibilities of a student at ASU.

“It brought tears to my eyes when she described how absolutely thrilled she was to realize her dream, and how she had to practically pinch herself when she was first here, as she was so overwhelmed with joy and so thankful for the opportunity to make her dream come true,” said Professor Heather Coleman, adjunct instructor of music. “I wish that all students would see their education as an opportunity and a gift like Rosey does.”

Rosey’s commitment to her studies didn’t start when she enrolled in classes at ASU; she was a hard worker before she entered high school.

As a 16-year-old, Rosey was accepted into The High School for Gifted Students, a prestigious high school in her hometown of Hanoi, Vietnam. After being accepted, Rosey was diligent to concentrate on her work so that she would receive a high GPA at graduation, and hopefully be accepted into a college in the U.S.  
During high school, one of Rosey’s teachers told her about ASU. She did some research on ASU’s website, clicking on activities and pictures, which convinced her that ASU was the school for her.

Rosey likens her excitement at arriving in the U.S. to a child receiving a gift.

“I just couldn’t believe that I was in America. I was so excited. It’s kind of very awesome and I couldn’t believe my eyes. Right now I’ve been here for almost two years. Wow,” Rosey said. “You can imagine my feeling. It’s kind of like a child when they receive a gift. That child must be so excited, and I have the same feeling when I came to America.”

Rosey has learned a lot about herself during her time at ASU. Although a lot of her time is spent studying for classes, she has found her niche. Rosey loves to volunteer.

During her time at ASU, Rosey has volunteered at 20 events with Volunteer ASU. She first heard about the program through ASU Digest. She checked for events daily, and signed up for as many events as she could. Rosey wanted to continue volunteering because she saw the benefits it had for international students.

Before becoming involved with Volunteer ASU, Rosey said she didn’t join in any activities at ASU. Through volunteering, she has improved her English, made friends and bettered the community. She now has many friends and goes to ESL classes, encouraging other international students to volunteer and telling them the advantages it has.

Rosey has impacted many lives. After speaking with an ESL class last semester, three students decided to volunteer. She also wrote an article for The Herald about volunteering and how it has changed her life. You can access the article on The Herald website.   
“I think Rosey is influential because her personality rubs off on others. Her joy is contagious and she challenges others in a good way. She shows great leadership at ASU through her constant service and involvement,” said Jodie Cherry, assistant director of the office of academic internships at the University of Memphis.  
Professor Coleman taught Rosey in a Fine Arts Musical class in the Spring of 2012, and since that time they have become friends. Coleman said Rosey has excellent leadership and time management skills, is organized, positive, undaunted by new challenges, caring and determined. She also said Rosey was “a delight to have in the classroom.”

“Rosey’s smile and her positive attitude are inspiring, and I can easily see how her personality and her energy would influence students on this campus,” Coleman said. “She has a wonderful work ethic and is incredibly determined.  She is one the most disciplined and devoted students I have ever observed on this campus.”

Rosey’s two role models are Jodie Cherry and Hillary Clinton.

Cherry was the coordinator of student affairs at ASU, and began the Volunteer ASU program. She worked closely with Rosey and knows her well.  
“Rosey is an extremely hard worker. She doesn’t commit to things unless she can give them 100 percent. I loved working with Rosey because I knew she would get the job done and do it with a smile on her face,” Cherry said.

Rosey works as a math tutor for the learning support center at ASU. She is also the co-president of the ASU chapter of National Society of Collegiate Scholars, Multicultural Center Ambassador, fundraising chair of Phi Beta Lambda ASU chapter and student engagement chair of Volunteer ASU Council.

She hopes to continue to make a difference at ASU by giving more students the opportunity to volunteer. She has applied for a position on the SAB, and if accepted, hopes to use that position to make a great impression on students.

“When I do anything I try my best; invest all my time, all my energy. I just try my best and if other students see and think it’s good, then I’m glad,” Rosey said, smiling.

Rosey is just a sophomore accounting major, but has worked hard and accomplished a lot. She has made her dreams a reality and is an example to students everywhere.


 

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