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Fowler looks to raise awareness

Women in Science group hopes to change statistics

Published: Thursday, September 6, 2012

Updated: Thursday, September 6, 2012 17:09

desiree fowler

Caitlin LaFarlette, Staff Photographer

Desiree Fowler, president of Women in Science, hopes to use her status to raise awareness and spread her vision.

Last year the Economics and Statistics Administration released a report stating that in 2009 women occupied 48 percent of all jobs, yet only 24 percent of women held STEM careers–a statistic that one ASU student hopes to change.

Desiree Fowler, a sophomore animal science major of Jonesboro, is using her status as the Women in Science president to spread knowledge about the group’s role in raising awareness about women in the science field.

Fowler initially joined Women in Science because she met the members and saw the potential the group had. “It could be built up, and I had a vision for it,” Fowler said.

That vision is what is helping Fowler set her goals for the club for the upcoming year. “I want us to be a positive effect on the collegiate community,” Fowler said.

She also has her sights set on gaining more members and, of course, encouraging young women to enter the science field.

One of Women in Science’s main projects is working with Girls of Promise, an organization focused on introducing young girls to science, technology, engineering and mathematics fields (otherwise known as STEM careers).

Fowler has worked with Girls of Promise at ASU for the past two years and will again add it to this year’s activities for Women in Science.

In addition, Fowler wants to host other science-based events for girls to participate in on campus.

“I want us to do something on nano-technology and other things in the science field, new developments,” Fowler said.

Dr. Anne Grippo, the interim director of environmental sciences, advises Women in Science.

“I get to know the students who are involved in the club in class and on a personal level,” Grippo said.

Being a professor allows Grippo to help the club gather information from around the campus. “I know what’s going on around campus from a different angle,” she said.

Grippo also assists Fowler. “I will forward new members’ emails to the president and reserve our rooms for meetings,” Grippo said.

Anytime the organization wants to get involved with things such as Breast Cancer Awareness Month that information goes through Grippo.

Things don’t always run smoothly for the sponsor, however. “Students from year to year have different interests and motivations,” Grippo said.

She has to take the students each year and work with all they want to do, even if that means deciding to not be in the club. “Sometimes those in elected positions have to drop,” she added.

Women in Science members are also doing what they can to aid Fowler. Arizona Smith, a junior pre-med major of Phoenix, Ariz., is the group’s treasurer.

Smith said that as treasurer she will help Fowler succeed with the finances of Women in Science, and also believed Fowler had set realistic goals for the group.

Those interested in joining Women in Science can email Fowler at desiree.fowler@smail.astate.edu.

Meetings are every other Thursday starting Sept. 6 at 5:30 p.m. in LSE 207.

For more information visit the Women in Science Facebook page at https://www.facebook.com/groups/178489392261703/ and follow the group on Twitter: @stAtewomeninsci.

For more information on women in STEM careers visit the Economics and Statistics Department online at http://www.esa.doc.gov/Blog/2011/08/03/stem-where-are-women.

 

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